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      "Visualizing the Black Body in Photography and Popular Culture" 2016-17 O'Fallon lecture in Eugene


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      January 12, 2017

      Thursday   7:30 PM

      955 E 13th Ave
      Eugene, Oregon

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      "Visualizing the Black Body in Photography and Popular Culture" 2016-17 O'Fallon lecture

      Deborah Willis is University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts, and an affiliated faculty member of Africana Studies in the Department of Social & Cultural Analysis at New York University. She teaches courses on Photography & Imaging, iconicity, and cultural histories visualizing the black body, women, and gender.  Her research examines photography’s multifaceted histories, visual culture, the photographic history of Slavery and Emancipation; contemporary women photographers and beauty.  

      She received the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellowship and was a Richard D. Cohen Fellow in African and African American Art, Hutchins Center, Harvard University; a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, and an Alphonse Fletcher, Jr. Fellow. She has pursued a dual professional career as an art photographer and as one of the nation's leading historians of African American photography and curator of African American culture.

      Willis is the author of Posing Beauty: African American Images from the 1890s to the Present; Out [o] Fashion Photography: Embracing Beauty; Reflections in Black: A History of Black Photographers - 1840 to the Present

      Cost: free

      Categories: Education | Art Galleries & Exhibits | University & Alumni

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